Nuclear WeaponsIt is 3 Minutes to Midnight

Donald Trump’s Remarks Signal He Could Start a New Nuclear Arms Race (2/23/2017)

It is estimated that the world will spend a combined US $1 trillion on nuclear weapons from 2011 to 2021. At roughly a $100 billion a year.., we are spending about forty times more a year on unnecessary nuclear weapons than on necessary UN expenses. All these confirm that humanity at large is behaving absurdly in many ways in managing our planet. Kishore Mahbubani: the Great Convergence pg 108
Why does India have nuclear weapons? Why does North Korea? Because when they went to the International Court of Justice in 1995 they said to the court, “We don’t have them yet, but we’re going to get them if they’re not declared illegal.” Other countries, too, are saying that if the nuclear states don’t honor Article 6 of the Nonproliferation Treaty, which requires the nuclear states to give up their arms, then they’re going to get them too. So, yes, if you assume that we have them and they have them, then we’re all under immediate threat." Elaine Scarry

Countdown to nuclear ban negotiations (2/16/2017)

Bulletin of Nuclear Scientists Moves Clock closer to Midnight- Thank Trump (1/26/2017)

10 Big Nuclear Ideas

See Command and Control (the film) on-line from PBS

George Kennan

Nuclear energy is not a civilian economic activity. It is an appendage of the nuclear weapons industry which is controlled by the so-called defense contractors. The powerful corporate interests behind nuclear energy and nuclear weapons overlap." Fukushima: A Nuclear War without a War: The Unspoken Crisis of Worldwide Nuclear Radiation 
"The United States possesses 8,000 active and operational nuclear warheads. Two thousand are on hair trigger alert, ready to be launched with 15 minutes warning. It is developing new systems of nuclear force, known as bunker busters. The British, ever cooperative, are intending to replace their own nuclear missile, Trident. Who, I wonder, are they aiming at? Osama bin Laden? You? Me? Joe Dokes? China? Paris? Who knows? What we do know is that this infantile insanity - the possession and threatened use of nuclear weapons - is at the heart of present American political philosophy. We must remind ourselves that the United States is on a permanent military footing and shows no sign of relaxing it." Harold Pinter Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech.
Richard Nixon in 1974, when he was threatened with impeachment. Revealingly, he told reporters, “I can go into my office and pick up the telephone, and in 25 minutes 70 million people will be dead.” (quoted in Elain Scarry's book: Thermonuclear Monarchy)
"It is my profound conviction that nuclear weapons did not, and will not, of themselves prevent major war. To the contrary, I am persuaded that the presence of these hideous devices unnecessarily prolonged and intensified the Cold War. In today's security environment, threats of their employment have been fully exposed as neither credible nor of any military utility." General Lee Butler
"...Every time a president has signed a nuclear arms control treaty, the Senate has demanded an increase in spending -- or, at times, the approval of new, more lethal nuclear weapons -- in exchange for its ratification. It's unlikely that the military or Congress would tolerate unilateral reductions, however sensible they may be." Rethinking Nuclear Policy, Foreign Affairs September/October 2016.
No Use"On the issue of nuclear weapons, the record is similarly interesting -- and frightening. It reveals very clearly that, from the earliest days, the security of the population was a non-issue, and remains so. There is no time here to run through the shocking record, but there is little doubt that it strongly supports the lament of General Lee Butler, the last commander of the Strategic Air Command, which was armed with nuclear weapons. In his words, we have so far survived the nuclear age “by some combination of skill, luck, and divine intervention, and I suspect the latter in greatest proportion.” And we can hardly count on continued divine intervention as policymakers play roulette with the fate of the species in pursuit of the driving factors in policy formation." Noam Chomsky
Rather than continue testing its Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles, the U.S. needs to become serious about meeting its obligations to achieve a world free of nuclear threats. This would require a world free of nuclear weapons, and is every bit as important as ending the dangers of climate change. David Krieger
the regular five-year NPT review conference, which ended in failure in April when the U.S. (joined by Canada and Great Britain) once again blocked efforts to move toward a weapons-of-mass-destruction-free zone in the Middle East. Such efforts have been led by Egypt and other Arab states for 20 years. As Jayantha Dhanapala and Sergio Duarte, leading figures in the promotion of such efforts at the NPT and other U.N. agencies, observe in “Is There a Future for the NPT?,” an article in the journal of the Arms Control Association: “The successful adoption in 1995 of the resolution on the establishment of a zone free of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) in the Middle East was the main element of a package that permitted the indefinite extension of the NPT.” The NPT, in turn, is the most important arms control treaty of all. If it were adhered to, it could end the scourge of nuclear weapons."  Noam Chomsky (8/20/2015)
"In periods of heightened tensions and reduced decision times, the likelihood of human and technical error in control systems increases. Launch-on-warning is a relic of Cold War strategy whose risk today far exceeds its value. Our leaders urgently need to talk and, we hope, agree to scrap this obsolete protocol before a devastating error occurs." General James E. Cartwright
the United States, Russia, the United Kingdom, France and China – each possess nuclear arms. They are legally obliged, under Article VI of the Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT), to pursue in good faith and conclude negotiations for the complete elimination of their nuclear forces. They are prohibited from engaging in activities (such as warhead modernization and the construction of new nuclear delivery vehicles) that would make this goal less likely or impossible to achieve. DontBankOnTheBomb
Plans for the future are hardly promising. In December the Congressional Budget Office reported that the U.S. nuclear arsenal will cost $355 billion over the next decade. In January the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies estimated that the U.S. would spend $1 trillion on the nuclear arsenal in the next 30 years. Noam Chomsky (2/2014)
the United States still refuses to ratify the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, despite being a signatory. Russia, on the other hand, ratified the agreement in 2000. Despite initially identifying the CTBT as a “top priority” during the President’s second term in March of 2013, the administration later acknowledged that getting Congress to move on the Test Ban fell somewhere between highly-unlikely and hopeless. Alex Ely 9/11/2014

Trump expands on tweet, explicitly endorses a nuclear arms race (12/22/2016)

Trump Says the U.S. Should Expand Its Nuclear Capacity (12/22/2016)

The UN makes history on a nuclear weapons ban. Does the US care? (11/2/2016)

US Votes 'No' As UN Adopts Landmark Resolution Calling to Ban Nuclear Weapons (10/27/2016)

Donald Trump, the Nuclear Arsenal, and Insanity (8/11/2016)

Preventing an American Fukushima (2016)

Ghosts of the Cold War: Rethinking the Need for a New Nuclear Cruise Missile (4/2016 REPORT)

The Pentagon wants to spend $1 trillion on new nuclear weapons over the next three decades. (2/29/2016)

The Invisible Epidemic: Radiation and Rising Rates of Thyroid Cancer (2/5/2016)

James Hansen’s Nuclear Fantasies (11/23/2015)

Russia Says Leak of Secret Nuclear Weapon Design Was an Accident (11/12/2015)

Mikhail Gorbachev: US Military an 'Insurmountable Obstacle to a Nuclear-Free World' (8/7/2015)

Obama Pledged to Reduce Nuclear Arsenal, then came this weapon (7/14/2015)

Revolving Door In the Nuclear Weapons Industry (7/1/2015)

US blocks nuclear disarmament document over Israel (5/23/2015)

Take Land Based nuclear Weapons off "hair-trigger" Alert

Call on Obama to cut big nuclear weapons spending

How the Obama Administration Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb: Theodore A. Postol (12/2014)

There's No Such Thing as Nuclear Democracy (9/26/2014)

Major Renewal of US Nuclear Arms (9/21/2014)

No One wants you to know how bad Fukushima Might Still Be (8/19/2014)

Why National Security Has NOthing to do with Security (8/5/2014)

Eliminate All Nuclear Weapons: Noam Chomsky (4/5/2014)

U.S. Planning to Spend 60 Billion to Modernize Nuclear Weapons (10/18/2013)

Letting Go of Our Nukes: Lawrence M. Kraus (7/6/2013)

In Nuclear Silos, Death Wears a Snuggie (1/14/2011)

The Deeper Meaning of Hiroshima

Since the rigged election and judicial coup which resulted in the illegitimate installation of President George W. Bush, and his extremist foreign policy team of nuclear hard-liners, the world has careened wildly toward the nuclear precipice. Continuing and accelerating existing nuclear war-fighting policies, Bush has radically lowered the threshold to the actual use of nuclear weapons. The current risk as measured by the “Doomsday Clock” of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists reads seven minutes to midnight, the closest since 1990. Given the present confluence of international developments including 9-11, impending total war against Iraq, the Bush Nuclear Posture Review, political instability in the Middle East and Southeast Asia, and the abrogation of the antiballistic Missile Treaty, the Doomsday Clock is, perhaps, running a bit slow. Nuclear Nightmare Redux. U.S. “First Strike” Nuclear Attacks. “Three Minutes to Midnight” (6/26/2015)
"It is my profound conviction that nuclear weapons did not, and will not, of themselves prevent major war. To the contrary, I am persuaded that the presence of these hideous devices unnecessarily prolonged and intensified the Cold War. In today's security environment, threats of their employment have been fully exposed as neither credible nor of any military utility." General Lee Butler
US wants more 'usable' nuclear weapons in Europe

Bibliography

Command and Control: Eric Schlosser

The Green Cowboy: An Energetic Life, S. David Freeman (2016)

Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear Disaster: Nobel Laureate Svetlana Alexievich

Thermonuclear Monarchy:  Elain Scarry

Nuclear Power is Not the Answer: Dr Helen Caldicott

No Breathing Room, The Aftermath of Chernobyl: Grigori Medvedev

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